Nouns : Abstract Nouns

 

Nouns : Abstract Nouns

An abstract noun is a word which names something that cannot be experienced by the five senses.  You cannot see, hear, touch, smell, or taste.


Abstract nouns can be hard to spot. Take for example ‘laughter’. There is a point of view that says it is an abstract noun, a concept; others maintain that because you can hear it, it can not be an abstract noun…

Other similar examples exist, but it is not worth the worry of trying to figure it out. The best thing you can probably do is to arm your pupils with a list of confirmed abstract nouns and teach them the principle behind them being such.


Common Abstract Nouns

Showing Human Qualities or Characteristics

beauty, bravery, brilliance, brutality. calm, charity, coldness, compassion, confidence, contentment, courage, curiosity, dedication, determination, ego, elegance, enthusiasm, envy, evil, fear, generosity, goodness, graciousness, hatred, honesty, honour, hope, humility, humour insanity, integrity, intelligence, jealousy, kindness, loyalty, maturity, patience, perseverance, sanity, self-control,  sensitivity, sophistication, stupidity, sympathy, talent, tolerance, trust, weakness, wisdom, wit

Showing Emotions/Feeling

adoration, amazement, anger, anxiety apprehension, clarity, delight, despair, disappointment, disbelief, excitement, fascination, friendship, grief, happiness, hate, helpfulness, helplessness, infatuation, joy, love, misery, pain, pleasure, power, pride, relaxation, relief, romance, sadness, satisfaction, silliness, sorrow, strength, surprise, tiredness, uncertainty, wariness, weariness, worry

More Examples of Abstract Nouns

ability, adventure, artistry, awe, belief , chaos, comfort, communication, consideration, crime, culture, customer service, death, deceit, defeat, democracy, dexterity, dictatorship, disquiet, disturbance, dream, energy, enhancement, failure, faith, faithfulness, faithlessness, favouritism, forgiveness, fragility, frailty, freedom, grace, hearsay, homelessness, hurt, idea, idiosyncrasy, imagination, impression, improvement, inflation, information, justice, knowledge, law, liberty, life, loss, luck, luxury, memory, mercy, motivation, movement, need, omen, opinion, opportunism, opportunity, parenthood, patriotism, peace, peculiarity, poverty, principle, reality, redemption, refreshment, riches, rumour, service, shock, skill, slavery, sleep, speculation, speed, strictness, submission, success, thought, thrill, truth, unemployment, unreality, victory, wealth.

There is this useful  word list of abstract nouns with definitions which, in addition to simply defining their meaning, demonstrates how abstract nouns are used in context, .

Time : Analog Clock Puzzle

Time : Puzzle Pic Clocks by mathplayground.com

This puzzle presents the user with 12 analog clocks showing different times.

A digital time is given under the array of clocks and the object of the game is to drag a piece of a jigsaw to the matching analog clock in the puzzle.

The ‘fast forward’ arrows allow the user to start a new game at the current level. The bars in the bottom left hand corner of the puzzle allow the user to select a level of difficulty.

This would work equally well as an interactive whiteboard activity or on individual tablets or desktop computers.

The game works well even on my elderly iPad…

 Puzzle Pic Clocks by mathplayground.com`

 

Nouns : Compound Nouns

Nouns : Compound Nouns

A compound noun is a noun that is made up of at least two words: firewood, pet shop, jack-in-the-box, blackboard,post office, six-pack

There are three forms for compound nouns:

  • With Spaces: ice cream, water tank, printer cartridge
  • Without Spaces: footprint, stopwatch, suitcase
  • With Hyphens: merry-go-round, passer-by, daughter-in-law

There are no hard and fast rules on which form to use. Just be aware that many of the words exist in more than one form.

You’ll just have to look them up if there is any doubt, Google is as good as anywhere…

Composition of Compound Nouns

Though there is no need for pupils of primary school age to be aware of any of what follows, I have included it for interest’s sake…

Most compound nouns are made up of two nouns or an adjective and a noun. For example:

  • Noun + Noun: bath tub, witchcraft, seaman, wall-paper
  • Adjective + Noun: hardware, highway, full moon, whiteboard
Compound elements Examples
noun + noun bedroom
water tank
motorcycle
printer cartridge
noun + verb rainfall
haircut
train-spotting
noun + adverb hanger-on
passer-by
verb + noun washing machine
driving licence
swimming pool
verb + adverb lookout
take-off
drawback
adverb + noun onlooker
bystander
adjective + verb dry-cleaning
public speaking
adjective + noun greenhouse
software
redhead
adverb + verb output
overthrow
upturn
input

Nouns : Common Nouns & Proper Nouns

Nouns : Common Nouns & Proper Nouns

A noun is a kind of word that gives a name to  a person, a place, an object, an animal, a substance, a quantity, a period of time, a distance; the list goes on.

Everything around us is represented by a word that gives it its name and that word is called a noun.

The first major distinction to draw is between common nouns and supermarket.

Common Nouns

The common noun, is by far the largest group of nouns. The job of the common noun is to give a name to the everyday things all around us. Take a look around your surroundings and make a list of objects which you can see, the list will most likely be made up entirely of common nouns : chair, table, floor, pen, ceiling, ruler, paper, floor, tree, grass – the list is virtually endless…

Common nouns do NOT get capital letters.

P:roper Nouns

A proper noun is the name given to a specific person, place, object, animal, etc : Susan, London, Blackpool Tower, Rex).

Proper nouns ALWAYS get capital letters.

 Common Noun Proper  Noun
car Jaguar, Land Rover, Fiesta
forest Forest of Dean
cat, dog, budgie Tiddles, Fido, Joey
sea, ocean North Sea, Atlantic Ocean
pub The Blacksmith’s Arms
monarch Queen Elizabeth II
supermarket Tesco, Morrison’s, Sainsbury’s
tea PG Tips, Yorkshire Tea
cola Pepsie, Coke

Common nouns may be further subdivided into a number of categories; all common nouns will fall into at least one of these categories, For the purposes of the primary school classroom (in addition to common nouns and proper nouns) if a student can identify compound, collective and abstract nouns this is probably sufficient. The others have been included for the sake of completeness and interest:

  • compound nouns
  • collective nouns
  • abstract nouns
  • concrete nouns
  • countable nouns
  • non-countable nouns
  • gender specific nouns
  • verbal nouns
  • gerunds

Parts of a Flowering Plant

Parts of a Flowering Plant

As a whole class activity for the interactive whiteboard it is an excellent Resource.

In the first part of the activity you are required to drag the various parts of a flower to the appropriate box on the screen. Once you have done this you can click on the magnifying icon in each box which gives details of the precise form and function of the different flow parts : petal, sepals, carpel, nectaries stamens and receptacle.

On the next screen, a more detailed diagram requires that the names of the various flower parts be dragged into the correct place to label the parts.

There is a help screen available to explain the activity. Each dragged item springs back into place when placed wrongly. As the default for pupils would be simply to drag everything until it fits, thus learning very little, this activity would be best paced by the teacher and used for dis cushion with a view to getting each element placed correctly the first time.

There is also Text and a  Quiz to accompany this activity. This activity is a Flash based animation and, as such, will not play on some tablets.

Parts of a Flowering Plant by BBC

 

Broken Calculator

Broken Calculator by Transum.org

A fun activity with some thinking necessary…

Children are asked to click the available keys on the ‘broken’ calculator above to make the numbers 1 – 20. As  each total is achieved the calculation used to achieve a given number will appear in the table on the right.Those who manage to make all twenty totals earn a ‘Transum Trophy’ – a certificate sent to their email (or their teacher’s email if they wish!).

Unlike a normal calculator, for this activity, you cannot use one total you have found to help make another. Each calculation starts from scratch (zero). I also noted that any multiplications are treated as though they are in brackets… they’ll figure it out! Try to make each total using the fewest number of calculator key presses.

Other broken calculators are available from the links within the activity: 1 & 5,  2 & 3,  3 & 4,  4 & 5, 5 $ 2

The activity is tablet friendly and plays well on my elderly iPad mini.

Broken Calculator by Transum.org